Tag Archives: Driving Tips

Road Construction Safety Tips

 

More and more major cities and towns are seeing an influx in road construction projects as the condition of local roadways become poor. To avoid the congestion road construction usually brings, many communities are resorting to night construction work.

This further increases the risks to construction workers in an already dangerous occupation. Construction workers risk their lives every day. The National Highway Administration cites that over 20, 000 workers are injured in road construction work zones. Twelve percent of these injuries are caused by incidents involving vehicles. On any given year, there are over 100 workplace fatalities in road construction sites. Almost half of road worker fatalities are caused by vehicles striking, running over or backing over workers.

While the cause of death among construction workers is split between work equipment and passing vehicles, you as a driver can do your part to improve road work construction safety and save lives.

Here are some tips to keep you, construction workers and other drivers safe while in construction zones:

Road Construction Safety Infographic

These road construction safety tips can save a life. Yes, it may be frustrating to get slowed down by road construction. Remember, road construction workers are sons, daughters, moms, dads, husbands, wives, brothers and sisters to someone and they’re improving the safety of our roads for all of our future travels. Be aware of your surroundings, be patient, expect unexpected behaviors and plan ahead. These safety tips are easy to remember and put into practice if you already practice defensive driving.

For more information about safe driving tips, please visit 911DrivingSchool.com.

 

How old do you need to be to begin your GDL program?

New drivers statistically have higher crash rates. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs allow young drivers to safely gain driving experience before obtaining full driving privileges.

Most programs include three stages:

  • Learner Stage: supervised driving, cumulating with a driving test;
  • Intermediate Stage: limiting unsupervised driving in high-risk situations; and
  • Full Privilege Stage: a standard driver’s license.

View our state map to see how old you need to be before starting your Graduated Driver Licensing Program.

GDL State Map Restrictions

 

Get more information on teen driving and adult driving courses at 911drivingschool.com.

How old do you need to be to begin your GDL program?

New drivers statistically have higher crash rates. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs allow young drivers to safely gain driving experience before obtaining full driving privileges.

Most programs include three stages:

  • Learner Stage: supervised driving, cumulating with a driving test;
  • Intermediate Stage: limiting unsupervised driving in high-risk situations; and
  • Full Privilege Stage: a standard driver’s license.

View our state map to see how old you need to be before starting your Graduated Driver Licensing Program.

GDL State Map Restrictions

Get more information on teen driving and adult driving courses at 911drivingschool.com.

7 Driving Tips That Could Save Your Teens Life

Some of the toughest jobs on the planet are: protecting our great country in battle, ice road trucking, Alaskan crab fishing, prison warden, and being a statuesque guard at Buckingham Palace. But those jobs are nothing compare to the challenges of being a parent.

The constant teaching, loving, and worrying that comes along with parenting is not a part-time gig, it’s around the clock, and it is as demanding as it is rewarding.

When you kids are young you worry that they will fall and hurt themselves, won’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, or if they are getting enough sleep. But parenting takes on a new level of difficulty as they grow into their teen years. This is because now your teenager has the right to operate, maneuver, and be in charge of a moving box of machinery and steel.  That’s right…  now your child can drive.

So how can you teach your new driver to be as safe as possible while driving?

 Here are 7 driving tips to share with your teenager

Driving Tips for teens

 

100 deadliest days to drive

Seven of the top 10 deadliest days of the year occurring between the Memorial Day and Labor Day holidays.

According to a 2010 AAA analysis of crash data by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the dates with the highest number of fatalities include June 10, July 4, July 9, Aug. 8 and Aug. 14

Facts on the 100 deadliest days of driving

  • There are 37 percent more highway fatalities on July 4 than the average July day. It is the deadliest day to drive with more than 409 motorists dying and more than 49, 500 people injured over the holiday weekends.
  • In 2013, more than 371, 000 people were injured, and nearly 3, 000 were killed in crashes involving a teen driver
  • Teens are 3x as likely to crash in the summer time due to the carefree attitude and more time with friends. Distracted driving is a real problem amongst teens,
  • the majority of people killed (66%) and injured (67%) in crashes involving a teen driver are people other than the teen themselves
  • In 2013, an average of 220 teen drivers and passengers died in traffic crashes during each of the summer months.

Driving Tips Infographic

 

Resources:

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/travel/july-4-weekend-may-be-deadliest-years-drivers-n384681

http://www.mnn.com/green-tech/transportation/sponsorstory/summer-months-are-the-deadliest-time-of-year-for-teen-drivers

 

National Distracted Driving Month

Distracted Driving

Stop distracted driving

From the moment, we wake up to the alarm on our phones we are bombarded by a world run on technology. We spend the day walking around with our head in our phones, laptops, and iPads.

We check the news (obsessively), update our social media profiles (so that people are aware that we had a turkey sandwich with a pesto spread for lunch), we snapchat our friends about the fact that it’s snowing (like they can’t see that themselves), we shop online for the perfect-unnecessary pair of legwarmers (which we’ll never wear), and call and text our family and friends for no good reasons at all.

Take back your time

The one thing missing from this is the time we spend driving. People forget how nice it feels to detach from the constant stream of information that technology gives us each day. Many forget how refreshing it is not hearing the constant “ding” of their phones for a while. Time spent driving is the best, and safest, way to give yourself a few minutes a day of peace from the outside world. This is your chance to sing your favorite songs at the top of your lungs and reflect on your day, but more importantly, this is the time to avoid getting yourself, and others injured or worse.

April is National Distracted Driver’s month and we would like to educate you with a few pointers on how to be a safe driver by avoiding the following distractions:

Emails

That last minute email you HAVE to send can wait while you drive home, or, if the email just can’t wait, pull over in a safe place for the 4 minutes it’ll take you to send it and help make the roads a little bit safer for all who travel on them.

Stop lights

One misconception about texting and driving is that there is a right time to do it, at a red light. If you are in your car… you are still driving. This counts as distracted driving. Perhaps the person behind you is only looking at the light and not the car in front them (you). While you are idly checking your messages with your head down, the car behind you only saw green and has now rear-ended you. Ruining both of your days and causing possible injuries. Say the person behind you was also uninsured? Maybe even left the scene. Now your day is ruined and your insurance payments go up. Not to mention possible medical bills.

What is more important?

Watching for brake lights or Facebook? A pedestrian or a text message? Telephone poles or phone calls? Know your priorities every time you get into your car.

Not just your safety

When you text and drive you are telling other drivers that you don’t care about their safety. Just like you, while driving distracted and putting your faith in other drivers to keep you safe, they may be doing the same thing. Two wrongs don’t make a right, they make fatal crashes happen. Never assume other drivers are watching out for you. It’s always safer to assume that they are hoping you are watching out for them.

Dashboard technology

Many cars these days have built-in dashboard technology. They have the ability to help us get to our destination, make hands-free phone calls, and navigate the radio without taking our eyes off the road. But this is more distracting than your think. More than 30 studies show hands-free devices don’t make drivers any safer – the brain still remains distracted by the conversation. If you have the ability to program your dashboard, do so before you start driving. This will help keep your attention where it belongs.

Multitasking

We’ve all seen the girl putting on her makeup in her rear-view mirror while talking on the phone. Or the guy who somehow thinks that eating a bowl of soup, while driving with his knee, on the freeway is a good idea. Multitasking is a myth when it comes to driving. Driving is a full-time attention hog. Phones, food, pets on laps, all things that cause crashes from a lack of concentration on the road.

Bottom line is that while you are maneuvering a vehicle out on the roads, you are not only in charge of your own safety, but you hold the safety of other drivers in your hands as well. The amount of fatal car crashes in the U.S. would significantly go down if everyone followed these rules. Remember that a text can wait, your mascara can be put on once your vehicle has completely stopped, and don’t eat soup in the car

Be a part of the solution.
Currently operating in 5 states with a 50 state online presence, 911 Driving Schools’ potential has been demonstrated by our loyal following. Our student base is rapidly expanding and has recently reached over 100, 000 successfully trained students nationwide. With new schools available, here’s the opportunity to set your course for success.
https://911drivingschool.com/franchise/

What to do after a car crash?

Tips for after a car crash

What do I do after a crash?

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, more than 32, 000 people died in traffic crashes in 2014.

Even after driving lessons and focused, proactive driving, a crash can happen. It is important to be ready for such an occurrence so you can keep yourself and others safe from further harm. Here are a few steps to take if involved in an accident:

Stay calm

Stay calm and make sure that everyone in the car is okay. Staying calm is important because erratic behavior can cause more damage to you, others or your vehicle. Have confidence that things will be okay. Be sure to turn on flashers and move your car to a safe location if safe to do so.

Make safety you first priority

If you cannot get out of the car or if someone is seriously hurt, be sure to keep your seat belt fastened and call 911. If the accident is not serious, turn on the emergency flashers as you get out of the car and assess the damage. If you feel unsafe, you can call 911 and ask for an officer to assist at the crash site.

Get the correct information

Ask for the driver’s license and insurance information from the other driver involved in the accident. Take down the name, address, phone number of the other driver and any passengers in their car and yours. If possible, take a picture of the other Drivers license, insurance card, and their vehicle license plate. This will ensure you can contact the person if there are any problems with your car or your health due to the crash. Take pictures of the damage and send them to your insurance agent— they can help you know what to do next.

After you assess damage and contact the police, take your car to a mechanic to get your car checked. This can save you money by detecting problems that you cannot see. So, remember to stay safe, call the right authorities and get the correct information at the crash site.

Also, remember that proactive driving can keep you from getting into a crash.  Find out more about our defensive driving courses at 911 Driving School.

What to do after a car crash?

Tips for after a car crash

What do I do after a crash?

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, more than 32, 000 people died in traffic crashes in 2014.

Even after driving lessons and focused, proactive driving, a crash can happen. It is important to be ready for such an occurrence so you can keep yourself and others safe from further harm. Here are a few steps to take if involved in an accident:

Stay calm

Stay calm and make sure that everyone in the car is okay. Staying calm is important because erratic behavior can cause more damage to you, others or your vehicle. Have confidence that things will be okay. Be sure to turn on flashers and move your car to a safe location if safe to do so.

Make safety you first priority

If you cannot get out of the car or if someone is seriously hurt, be sure to keep your seat belt fastened and call 911. If the accident is not serious, turn on the emergency flashers as you get out of the car and assess the damage. If you feel unsafe, you can call 911 and ask for an officer to assist at the crash site.

Get the correct information

Ask for the driver’s license and insurance information from the other driver involved in the accident. Take down the name, address, phone number of the other driver and any passengers in their car and yours. If possible, take a picture of the other Drivers license, insurance card, and their vehicle license plate. This will ensure you can contact the person if there are any problems with your car or your health due to the crash. Take pictures of the damage and send them to your insurance agent— they can help you know what to do next.

After you assess damage and contact the police, take your car to a mechanic to get your car checked. This can save you money by detecting problems that you cannot see. So, remember to stay safe, call the right authorities and get the correct information at the crash site.

Also, remember that proactive driving can keep you from getting into a crash.  Find out more about our defensive driving courses at 911 Driving School.