Parenting Tips on How to Practice With Your New Driver

It seemed like in a matter of a blink your child is now a new driver. You’ve been preparing for this big milestone in your child’s life. Still, it seemed to have come too fast.

You’re excited for your child, but you’re also worried. Teen drivers get in more accidents than any other group. You want your son or daughter to be safe. How do you teach them to be good, safe drivers?

The most effective answer is practice. The more on-the-road driving experience your student has, the quicker they will learn and the more confidence they will build.

Every state requires driver’s education students to attend a certified driving school that incorporates mandatory classroom and on-the-road driving hours.

In addition, most states require students to have a certain number of driving hours at home, outside of the driving school.

This is where you, as the parent come in.

Teen drivers are inexperienced and often lack driving confidence. Be patient when riding with your son or daughter and continually encourage them.

In many instances, the learning doesn’t begin and end in the car. Talk to your child before the practice drive and afterwards. Try to limit the amount of talking during the actual driving.

Before the Driving Session

Map out a route and show the route to your child. When mapping out routes, keep in mind your child’s driving experience. Avoid busy, major streets. Instead, stay on quiet, less congested side streets.

Just as having a delegated route, pick a couple, specific road skills to focus on during each practice drive.

Tell your driver to leave their cell phone at home.

Make sure the student has properly adjusted both side mirrors and the rearview mirror.

Having a route will give both you and your new driver peace of mind. It will eliminate you having to come up with a route on the fly, which can involve the sudden “turn here” commands.

Instead, you can try “commentary driving” technique where your student calls out things as they see them. This technique enhances the new driver’s peripheral vision and can give you some peace of mind knowing that your son or daughter is alert and aware.

Remind yourself to be patient and calm. Avoid raising your voice, scolding or talking down to your student while on the road.

During the Driving Session

Start the driving sessions short, gradually increasing their lengths as your driver gets more comfortable and confident. The first few driving sessions should be between 15 and 20 minutes.

Teen drivers are nervous and can get distracted easily. Avoid excessive talking to your student while he or she is driving. You want them to focus on the road, not on your conversation.

Stick to the route and be sure to give your son or daughter advance warning on where to turn. Sudden shouts of “turn here!” will only add to your child’s stress and lack of confidence.

Gently point out the mistakes your child made and explain why it was wrong. Discussing the mistakes during the drive is more effective than waiting until you get home to share it. When going over these mistakes, have your child pull the car over. You don’t want to be talking while your child is trying to drive.

Be the eyes for your teen driver. Teens have not yet learned to scan ahead nor look around at what is happening around the vehicle. They can’t anticipate or see potential hazards. They are often only focused on what is right in front of them.

Refrain from pushing your own instruction and suggestions if it doesn’t match what your teen driver has been taught in driver’s ed. Doing this will confuse your student.

After the Driving Session

Review the session with your child, highlighting what they did well and repeating the errors that happened.

Ask your son or daughter to provide their own feedback and assessment on their driving. Also, ask your child what he or she learned.

Lead by example. As your teen is now a driver, he or she will be ever more observant of your driving habits. Knowing that your driving skills are under scrutiny, make the added effort to drive like a model driver. You want your child to pick up correct, safe, good driving habits, not bad, risky ones.

As a parent to a new driver, you have a great responsibility and privilege to teach them good driving habits.

If there is a soon-to-be driver in your home, trust their driver’s education to 911 Driving School. Contact us today for more information about our classes and locations.

Tips for Safe Holiday Driving

Millions of Americans take the phrase “there’s no place like home for the holidays” literally. The mass migration of drivers to see friends and family near and far can bring anticipation and excitement. In more times than not, the trek and the traffic can be stressful and anything but peaceful. If you or your family is planning on driving home during the holidays, here are some safe driving tips that will make the journey more enjoyable for everyone.

  1. Pack accordingly. Besides your typical trip essentials, be sure to pack your cell phone cords, a paper map (yes, they still do exist), extra change for toll roads, and plenty of water and snacks (especially if you have kids in tow.)
  2. Make sure the car is ready to go. While breaking down along the Interstate in pouring rain may make for a funny, memorable story in the future, it can easily take away the joy and relaxation of the holidays in the moment. Avoid these unexpected breakdowns by having a mechanic look over the tires, breaks, engine and windshield wipers before the trip.
  3. Avoid peak travel times. The day before Thanksgiving (Wednesday) and the Sunday following Thanksgiving, for instance are the busiest travel days. To avoid traffic, consider taking a couple extra vacation days and leave on the Monday or Tuesday before Thanksgiving instead and coming back on the Monday following Thanksgiving.
  4. Get plenty of rest. Hours on the road may not seem like a hard, strenuous activity, but it requires constant attention and alertness. You’re more likely to have an incident when you’re deprived of sleep and your judgment is impaired. If you’re driving long distances, regularly stop to stretch your legs and get fresh air to help you stay awake.
  5. Remain calm. It’s easier to say than to be calm during a holiday traffic jam, but taking deep breaths and resisting the urge to drive like a mad-man will make the drive more relaxing and enjoyable. It’s also easier to stay calm when you don’t overbook your holiday schedule and feel pressured to get everywhere as fast as you can.
  6. Avoid distracted driving. Talking on the phone and texting are quickly becoming one of the biggest causes of traffic incidents. Driving, especially long distances and in unfamiliar areas require careful, undivided attention always. If you need to make a phone call, send a text, look something up on the Internet or simply eat, pull off the road.
  7. Keep a safe following distance. If you’re lucky enough to travel in the day and in good weather, a 3 second gap between your car and the one in front of it is recommended. In rain or snow, this three second following distance should be at least doubled. If someone is tailgating you, pull over and let them pass.
  8. Take an alternate way home. Instead of going home the same old boring way, why not switch it up a little? Try side roads instead of the Interstate. A change of scenery can be relaxing and prettier to look at. You may even get around traffic.
  9. Avoid driving impaired. Alcohol is a hallmark of holiday parties, dinners and celebrations. Drinking while intoxicated slows your reaction time and impairs your judgement. It can also lead to fatigue while driving. Every year, impaired drivers are responsible for fatal auto accidents. If you do drink, drink in moderation or have a designated driver.

Don’t let your anxiety of driving dampen the excitement of spending time with friends and family this holiday season. If you would like to improve your overall skills behind the wheel, contact 911 Driving School today.

911 Driving School Hits Headlines

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911 Driving School is best known for its driver services, where they inspire, educate, engage and motivate drivers of all ages to put safety first behind the wheel.

Recently, 911 was featured in PoliceOne, an online publication serving current and former police, to tell the story of 911 franchisee Jeff Westover who is positively influencing his community in Pierce County, Washington.

“It is rewarding. You are willing to give your life for another person as a cop. In this situation, you get to save lives and don’t have to risk yours doing it,” he said in the article. “We’re beating those national averages. We have lower fatality rates, lower ticket counts than other driving schools here. (Instructors) are out in the community making a positive difference. They are providing a service that truly will save someone’s life.”

Click here to read the full article in PoliceOne.

To learn more about 911 Driving Schools’ franchise opportunities, visit https://911drivingschool.com/franchise/.

Keep Drivers and the Public Safe on Halloween with these Driving Tips

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The scariest part of Halloween isn’t the costumes, haunted houses or movies. It’s a day when, on average, twice as many child pedestrians are killed to other days of the year.

In order to combat the perpetuation of these statistics, 911 Driving School, which provides defensive driving courses and drivers education classes for adults and teens, has put together a list of driver safety tips for Halloween:

  • Children and adults alike wear dark costumes, and the days are getting shorter. Chances are good that you’ll see people out and about – practice defensive driving when behind the wheel, and always drive very slowly in residential areas, observing traffic laws, school zones and speed limits and taking special care to look around before turning.
  • Always use your turn signals, even if you’re in your own neighborhood or close to home. People may be difficult to spot in costume; expect the unexpected.
  • Decorations can be a distraction – keep your eyes open for large objects such as pumpkins in the road and flashing lights.
  • Check your city’s posted times for trick-or-treating, and avoid driving during these times if possible.

For more information on these and other driving tips, or to sign up for safe driving classes in your area, click here.

Child Passenger Safety Week is Approaching – Check Your Car to Prevent a Tragedy

Child Passenger Safety Week

Quickly approaching, Child Passenger Safety Week (Sept. 18-24) and National Seat Check Saturday (Sept. 24) are the perfect time to refresh yourself on the newest safety rules for driving in cars with children.

Car crashes are a leading cause of death in the 1-13 age group, and the majority of these deaths and injuries can be prevented by the proper use of car seats, boosters and seat belts. One of the most important things to remember: weight restrictions are important to child car safety.

Each car seat has its own weight limits, and kids need different seats for different stages of life. From birth until they exceed the weight limit for a booster seat and can safely ride without one, make sure that children are properly protected. After all, car seats reduce the risk of kids being killed in cars by up to 71 percent.

Always refer to your car seat manufacturer’s guidelines as well as federal laws for the most up-to-date information on weight limits – it’s worth a few minutes of research to make sure the kids are safe.

At 911 Driving School, students learn the importance of these critical safety rules – find a location near you here.

Child Passenger Safety Week is Approaching – Check Your Car to Prevent a Tragedy

Child Passenger Safety Week

Quickly approaching, Child Passenger Safety Week (Sept. 18-24) and National Seat Check Saturday (Sept. 24) are the perfect time to refresh yourself on the newest safety rules for driving in cars with children.

Car crashes are a leading cause of death in the 1-13 age group, and the majority of these deaths and injuries can be prevented by the proper use of car seats, boosters and seat belts. One of the most important things to remember: weight restrictions are important to child car safety.

Each car seat has its own weight limits, and kids need different seats for different stages of life. From birth until they exceed the weight limit for a booster seat and can safely ride without one, make sure that children are properly protected. After all, car seats reduce the risk of kids being killed in cars by up to 71 percent.

Always refer to your car seat manufacturer’s guidelines as well as federal laws for the most up-to-date information on weight limits – it’s worth a few minutes of research to make sure the kids are safe.

At 911 Driving School, students learn the importance of these critical safety rules – find a location near you here.

Improve Your Au Pair’s Driving Skills

Au pair driving courses

Working a demanding 9-5 job while juggling young children is a real struggle for many American households. It is not uncommon to have both parents working full time to live comfortably and pay the bills. Some turn to pre-school, daycare, babysitters and nannies. Others turn to au pairs (or nannies from other countries).

Like other child care providers, parents work with agencies to do careful background checks and examinations of the au pair’s experience and qualifications. While many au pairs have child care experience, their lack of driving skills in a foreign country can be concerning.

Many Americans live in suburbs and areas outside the city, making travel by car a necessity. This is problematic as some au pairs don’t know how to drive or have a driver’s license. This understandably causes concerns from parents who are entrusting their children with someone who will likely be driving them around town. While the lack of driving experience may deter some host families, others have turned to helping their au pair learn to legally drive.

Options for Improving Your Au Pair’s Driving

If you’re of the camp that is willing to work with your au pair to improve and develop their driving skills, there are many online and on-the-road driving training courses to choose from.  Below is a list of possible ideas to help your au pair become a safe driver.

Before entering the country:

Some families want their au pair to be familiar with driving before arriving at their doorstep. The Internet is by far the best option for this scenario. Going this route, you can select an online driving course that fits your needs and budget,.The au pair can then complete the online course on their own computer in the comfort of their  own home. Many online driving courses also offer practice written exams to test the au pair’s driving course knowledge. Completing an online driving course prior to entering the country will speed up the time it takes for the au pair to obtain their  driver’s license.

After entering the country:

Though some families would advise having your au pair learn the basics of driving before arriving, sometimes that may not be an option.

  • Online courses-These can still work, especially if you’re in immediate need of someone staying home with your kids. In-person classes work great if your schedule has some flexibility.
  • Enroll in a driving school– Your au pair will only be able to get behind the wheel training and testing after they have arrived anyways, so why not enroll them  in an adult driving class? They  will learn about safe driving while having the opportunity to socialize. Every city has at least one driving school for you to choose from.
  • Take them out driving– Practice makes perfect, the more behind-the-wheel your au pair gets the more confident you both will feel and their chances of passing the driving test will increase.

Don’t risk the welfare of your kids, the au pair or other drivers by not teaching your au pair to drive. If you know frequent, daily driving will be a part of the au pair’s responsibilities, asking about the au pair’s driving experience during the interviewing and screening process can help you weed down the ones that will be the best fit for your family.

If you do get matched with an au pair without driving experience, know that there are many options available you can choose from to suit your needs, schedule, and budget. Contact 911DrivingSchool.com for more information about classes available.

Road Construction Safety Tips

 

More and more major cities and towns are seeing an influx in road construction projects as the condition of local roadways become poor. To avoid the congestion road construction usually brings, many communities are resorting to night construction work.

This further increases the risks to construction workers in an already dangerous occupation. Construction workers risk their lives every day. The National Highway Administration cites that over 20,000 workers are injured in road construction work zones. Twelve percent of these injuries are caused by incidents involving vehicles. On any given year, there are over 100 workplace fatalities in road construction sites. Almost half of road worker fatalities are caused by vehicles striking, running over or backing over workers.

While the cause of death among construction workers is split between work equipment and passing vehicles, you as a driver can do your part to improve road work construction safety and save lives.

Here are some tips to keep you, construction workers and other drivers safe while in construction zones:

Road Construction Safety Infographic

These road construction safety tips can save a life. Yes, it may be frustrating to get slowed down by road construction. Remember, road construction workers are sons, daughters, moms, dads, husbands, wives, brothers and sisters to someone and they’re improving the safety of our roads for all of our future travels. Be aware of your surroundings, be patient, expect unexpected behaviors and plan ahead. These safety tips are easy to remember and put into practice if you already practice defensive driving.

For more information about safe driving tips, please visit 911DrivingSchool.com.

 

How old do you need to be to begin your GDL program?

New drivers statistically have higher crash rates. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs allow young drivers to safely gain driving experience before obtaining full driving privileges.

Most programs include three stages:

  • Learner Stage: supervised driving, cumulating with a driving test;
  • Intermediate Stage: limiting unsupervised driving in high-risk situations; and
  • Full Privilege Stage: a standard driver’s license.

View our state map to see how old you need to be before starting your Graduated Driver Licensing Program.

GDL State Map Restrictions

Get more information on teen driving and adult driving courses at 911drivingschool.com.